Tau Teh Ching - academic tools comparison of different translations St. Xenophon Library

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Click on a sentence 1 2 3 4 5 Chapter 33 Chapter 35 Back to index

Ch. 34 Sentence 1
Beck The great Way flows everywhere, both left and right.
Blackney O the great Way o'erflows And spreads on every side!
Bynner Bountiful life, letting anyone attend, Making no distinction between left or right.
Byrn The great Tao flows unobstructed in every direction.
Chan The Great Tao flows everywhere. It may go left or right.
Cleary The Great Way is universal; it can apply to the left or the right.
Crowley The Dao is immanent; it extends to the right hand as to the left.
Hansen The great guide is everywhere! Thus it can 'left' the 'right.'
LaFargue Great Tao drifts - it can go right or go left.
Legge All-pervading is the Great Tao! It may be found on the left hand and on the right.
Lindauer Great tao flowing everywhere It can be left or right
LinYutan The Great Tao flows everywhere, (Like a flood) it may go left or right.
Mabry The great Tao flows everywhere, to the left and to the right.
McDonald Some great dao can flow everywhere. Like a flood it can go left or right. Like a drifting boat it can go this way or that.
Merel The Way flows and ebbs, creating and destroying,
Mitchell The great Tao flows everywhere.
Muller The Tao is like a great flooding river. How can it be directed to the left or right?
Red Pine The Tao drifts it can go left or right
Ta-Kao The great Tao pervades everywhere, both on the left and on the right.
Walker The great Tao floods and flows in every direction.
Wayism  
Wieger The great Principle extends itself in all directions.
World Infinity permeates everything in every direction; to the left as well as to the right.
Wu The Great Tao is universal like a flood. How can it be turned to the right or to the left?


Ch. 34 Sentence 2
Beck All things derive their life from it, and it does not turn away from them. It accomplishes its work, but does not take possession. It provides for and nourishes everything, but does not control them.
Blackney All beings come from it; No creature is denied. But having called them forth, It calls not one its own. It feeds and clothes them all And will not be their lord.
Bynner Feeding everyone, refusing no one, Has not provided this bounty to show how much it owns, Has not fed and clad its guests with any thought of claim;
Byrn All things rely on it to conceive and be born, and it does not deny even the smallest of creation. When it has accomplished great wonders, it does not claim them for itself. It nourishes infinite worlds, yet it doesn't seek to master the smallest creature.
Chan All things depend on it for life, and it does not turn away from them. It accomplishes its task, but does not claim credit for it. It clothes and feeds all things but does not claim to be master over them.
Cleary All beings depend on it for life, and it does not refuse. Its accomplishments fulfilled, it does not dwell on them. It lovingly nurtures all beings, but does not act as their ruler.
Crowley All things derive from it their being; it creates them, and all comply with it. Its work is done, and it proclaims it not. It is the ornament of all things, yet it claims not fief of them;
Hansen The ten-thousand natural kinds depend on it and thus live. And it does not phrase its guidance. Success is achieved and not named as 'having.' Supports and nourishes the ten-thousand natural kinds and does not deem-act as lord.
LaFargue The thousands of things depend on it for life, it rejects nothing. It achieves successes, but does not hold tight to the fame. It clothes and feeds the thousands of things but does not act the ruler.
Legge All things depend on it for their production, which it gives to them, not one refusing obedience to it. When its work is accomplished, it does not claim the name of having done it. It clothes all things as with a garment, and makes no assumption of being their lord; -
Lindauer All things depend on it yet exist yet without being denied. Outstanding service is performed without the presence of names It clothes and cultivates the 10000 things Yet without acting as lord.
LinYutan The myriad things derive their life from it, And it does not deny them. When its work is accomplished, It does not take possession. It clothes and feeds the myriad things, Yet does not claim them as its own.
Mabry All things rely on it for their life and it does not refuse them. When its work is done, it does not demand recognition. It clothes and nourishes all things and does not demand allegiance.
McDonald All things [eventually] derive their life from it. It hardly denies or disowns them. It accomplishes its task, but seem to claim no credit for it. It hardly takes possession of anyone, either. So though it covers all there is like some garment, it hardly takes possession. It can clothe and feed all beings but hardly claims to be guru over them.
Merel Implementing all the world, attending to the tiniest details, Claiming nothing in return. It nurtures all things, Though it does not control them;
Mitchell All things are born from it, yet it doesn't create them. It pours itself into its work, yet it makes no claim. It nourishes infinite worlds, yet it doesn't hold on to them.
Muller The myriad things rely on it for their life but do not distinguish it. It brings to completion but cannot be said to exist. It clothes and feeds all things without lording over them.
Red Pine everything lives by its grace but it doesn't speak when its work succeeds it makes no claim it has no desires
Ta-Kao By it all things came into being, and it does not reject them. Merits accomplished, it does not possess them. It loves and nourishes all things but does not dominate over them.
Walker Everything in existence depends on it, and it doesn't deny them. It accomplishes its work without naming or making claims for itself. Everything in existence is clothed and nourished by it, but it doesn't lord over anything.
Wayism  
Wieger It lends itself willingly to the genesis of all beings (its participants). When a work is accomplished, it does not attribute it to itself. It nourishes all beings with kindness, without imposing itself on them as a master (for having nourished them; leaving them free; not exacting any degrading return from them).
World It is the potential of all things, and the manifestation of all things. Its total essence resides in all things. It has no purpose. It is complete in its indifference. It manifests and disintegrates all things forever. It sustains all things, yet it is the god of no thing.
Wu All creatures depend on it, And it denies nothing to anyone. It does its work, But makes no claims for itself. It clothes and feeds all, But it does not lord it over them:


Ch. 34 Sentence 3
Beck Always without desires, it may be considered small.
Blackney Without desire always, It seems of slight import.
Bynner And, because it lacks the twist Of mind and body in what it has done, The guile of head or hands, Is not always respected by a guest.
Byrn Since it is without wants and desires, it can be considered humble.
Chan Always without desires it may be called the Small.
Cleary As it has no desire, it can be called small.
Crowley there is nothing so small that it inhabits not, and informs it.
Hansen Treating lack of desire as constant; it can be named in the direction of 'small.'
LaFargue Always: Desiring nothing, it can be called 'of no account.'
Legge it may be named in the smallest things.
Lindauer With entireness absent of desire One can name in relation to smallness
LinYutan Often (regarded) without mind or passion, It may be considered small.
Mabry Since it makes no demands for itself, it can seem to be of small regard.
McDonald Therefore it can perhaps be called low and quite free from insignificant desires.
Merel It has no intention, So it seems inconsequential. It is the substance of all things; Though it does not control them;
Mitchell Since it is merged with all things and hidden in their hearts, it can be called humble.
Muller It is always desireless, so we call it "the small."
Red Pine shall we call it small
Ta-Kao It is always non-existent; therefore it can be named as small.
Walker Aimless, ambitionless, it might be called "small."
Wayism  
Wieger Because of its constant disinterestedness, one might think it would become diminished. This is not so.
World It has no purpose. It is Infinitely insignificant.
Wu Thus, it may be called "the Little."


Ch. 34 Sentence 4
Beck The destination of all things, yet claiming nothing, it may be considered great.
Blackney Yet, nonetheless, in this Its greatness still appears: When they return to it, No creature meets a lord.
Bynner Others appreciate welcome from the perfect host
Byrn All of creation seeks it for refuge yet it does not seek to master or control.
Chan All things come to it and it does not master them; it may be called the Great.
Cleary All beings take to it, yet it does not act as their ruler, it can be called great.
Crowley All things return without knowledge of the Cause thereof; there is nothing so great that is inhabits not, and informs it.
Hansen The ten-thousand natural kinds return to it and it does not deem-act as lord. It can be named as 'great.'
LaFargue The thousands of things turn back to it but it does not act the ruler - it can be called 'Great'
Legge All things return (to their root and disappear), and do not know that it is it which presides over their doing so; - it may be named in the greatest things.
Lindauer The 10000 things merge and blend Yet without action as lord one can name great actions.
LinYutan Being the home of all things, yet claiming not, It may be considered great.
Mabry Yet as all things return to it of their own accord, without being commanded, it can truly be regarded Great.
McDonald To turn into the home of all things, don't make any outer claims. (Implied; cf. Y) See into how dao is by non-desiring empty mind. (Cf. Y) Ten thousand [hungry] creatures obey a dao master and his ways, though they hardly understand it or how. Dao is called great. And the man who lives it or a dao repertoire is called great as well. The wise man never strives [verbally] for the great. To the end the wise dao man doesn't claim any outer greatness. Thus [some degree of subtle Vossa-] greatness is installed.
Merel It has no exception, So it seems all-important.
Mitchell Since all things vanish into it and it alone endures, it can be called great.
Muller The myriad things return to it and it doesn't exact lordship Thus it can be called "great."
Red Pine everything turns to it but it wields no control shall we call it great
Ta-Kao All things return home to it, and it does not claim mastery over them; therefore it can be named as great.
Walker Everything in existence returns to it, and still it doesn't lord over anything. Thus it might also be called "great."
Wayism  
Wieger All beings to who it is so liberal, run towards it. It therefore finds itself magnified (through this universal trust).
World All manifestations after a time disintegrate back into It, yet It is the god of no thing. It permeates everything and so there is nothing outside its realm.
Wu All things return to it as to their home, But it does not lord it over them: Thus, it may be called "the Great."


Ch. 34 Sentence 5
Beck Because it never claims greatness, its greatness is achieved.
Blackney The Wise Man, therefore, while he is alive, Will never make a show of being great: And that is how his greatness is achieved.
Bynner Who, barely appearing to exist, Exists the most.
Byrn Because it does not seek greatness; it is able to accomplish truly great things.
Chan Therefore (the sage) never strives himself for the great, and thereby the great is achieved.
Cleary Therefore sages never contrive greatness; that is why they can become so great.
Crowley In this manner also may the Sage perform his Works. It is not by thrusting himself forward that he wins to his success.
Hansen With its ultimately not self-deeming as 'great' Hence it is able to achieve its 'great.'
LaFargue Because in the end it does not insist on its own greatness, yes, it is able to achieve its full greatness.
Legge Hence the sage is able (in the same way) to accomplish his great achievements. It is through his not making himself great that he can accomplish them.
Lindauer What is entirely without a self to act great happens So it is able to perfect what is great.
LinYutan Because to the end it does not claim greatness, Its greatness is achieved.
Mabry It is only because it does not claim to be Great That it is able to achieve such Greatness.
McDonald And the wise man never at any time hardly ever makes a show of greatness. By such a dogged, keen strategy some [clowns] achieves greatness.
Merel The sage would not control the world; He is in harmony with the world.
Mitchell It isn't aware of its greatness; thus it is truly great.
Muller Till the end, it does not regard itself as Great. Therefore it actualizes its greatness.
Red Pine therefore the sage never acts great thus he can do great things
Ta-Kao Because it never assumes greatness, therefore it can accomplish greatness.
Walker Because it has no desire to be great, it can achieve greatness.
Wayism  
Wieger The Sage imitates this conduct. He, also, makes himself small (through his disinterestedness and his delicate reserve), and acquires thereby true greatness.
World It cannot appear great because it is at one with everything
Wu It is just because it does no wish to be great That its greatness is fully realized.