Tau Teh Ching - academic tools comparison of different translations St. Xenophon Library

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Click on a sentence 1 2 3 4 Chapter 4 Chapter 6 Back to index

Ch. 05 Sentence 1
Beck Nature is not humane. It treats all things like sacrificial objects.
Blackney Is then the world unkind? And does it treat all things Like straw dogs used in magic rights
Bynner Nature, immune as to a sacrifice of straw dogs, Faces the decay of its fruits.
Byrn Heaven and Earth are impartial; they treat all of creation as straw dogs.
Chan Heaven and Earth are not humane. They regard all things a straw dogs.
Cleary Heaven and earth are not humane; they regard all beings as straw dogs.
Crowley Heaven and Earth produce without motive, but casually, in their order of nature, dealing with all things carelessly, like used talismans.
Hansen Heaven-earth [the cosmos] is not kind. It treats the 10,000 natural kinds as straw dogs.
LaFargue "Heaven and Earth are not Good they treat the thousands of things like straw dogs
Legge Heaven and earth do not act from (the impulse of) any wish to be benevolent; they deal with all things as the dogs of grass are dealt with.
Lindauer Heavens and earth are without humanizing It happens that the 10000 things act as straw dogs
LinYutan Nature is unkind: It treats the creation like sacrificial straw-dogs.
Mabry Heaven and Earth are impartial, They allow things to die.
McDonald The universe seems without mercy, quite ruthless; in that wider perspective all things are but as ritual straw dogs.
Merel Nature is not kind; It treats all things impartially.
Mitchell The Tao doesn't take sides; it gives birth to both good and evil.
Muller Heaven and Earth are not jen, And regard the people as straw dogs.
Red Pine Heaven and Earth are heartless treating creatures like straw dogs
Ta-Kao Heaven and earth do not own their benevolence, To them all things are straw dogs
Walker Heaven and Earth are not sentimental; they regard all things as dispensable.
Wayism The Tao does not take sides; it gives birth to both good and evil. Material things are like incense sticks, burned in worship but discarded ashes.
Wieger Heaven and earth are not good to the things that they produce, but treat them like straw dogs.
World Heaven and earth are indifferent. All creatures are considered straw dogs; not distinguished, not judged.
Wu Heaven-and-Earth is not sentimental; It treats all things as straw-dogs.


Ch. 05 Sentence 2
Beck The wise are not humane. They regard people like sacrificial objects.
Blackney The Wise man too, is he unkind? And does he treat the folk Like straw dogs made to throw away?
Bynner A sound man, immune as to a sacrifice of straw dogs, Faces the passing of human generations.
Byrn The Master doesn't take sides; she treats everyone like a straw dog.
Chan The sage is not humane. He regards all people as straw dogs.
Cleary Sages are not humane; they see all people as straw dogs..
Crowley So also the sages deal with their people, not exercising benevolence, but allowing the nature of all to move without friction.
Hansen Sages are not kind. They treat the hundred surname-groups as straw dogs.
LaFargue The Wise Person is not Good he treats the hundred clans like straw dogs."
Legge The sages do not act from (any wish to be) benevolent; they deal with the people as the dogs of grass are dealt with.
Lindauer Sages are without humanizing It happens that one hundred families act as straw dogs.
LinYutan The Sage is unkind: He treats the people like sacrificial straw-dogs.
Mabry The Sage is not sentimental, She knows that all beings must pass away.
McDonald The wise man too is hard as nail; to him the people are but as straw dogs to throw.
Merel The Sage is not kind, And treats all people impartially.
Mitchell The Master doesn't take sides; she welcomes saints and sinners.
Muller The sage is not jen, And regards all things as straw dogs.
Red Pine heartless is the sage treating people like straw dogs
Ta-Kao The Sage does not own his benevolence; To him the people are straw dogs.
Walker The sage isn't sentimental, either; He views all forms as ephemeral and transitional.
Wayism The master does not take sides; she welcomes both saints and sinners.16
Wieger Like heaven and earth, the Sage is not good for the people he governs, but treats them like straw dogs.
World The sage is indifferent. All people are one; not distinguished, not judged.
Wu The Sage is not sentimental; He treats all his people as straw-dogs.


Ch. 05 Sentence 3
Beck How the universe is like a bellows! While empty, it is never exhausted. The more it is worked, the more it produces.
Blackney Between the earth and sky The space is like a bellows, Empty but unspent. When moved its gift is copious.
Bynner The universe, like a bellows, Is always emptying, always full: The more it yields, the more it holds.
Byrn The space between Heaven and Earth is like a bellows; it is empty, yet has not lost its power. The more it is used, the more it produces; the more you talk of it, the less you comprehend.
Chan How Heaven and Earth are like a bellows. While vacuous, it is never exhausted. When active, it produces even more.
Cleary The space between heaven and earth is like a bellows and pipes, empty yet inexhaustible, producing more with each movement.
Crowley The space between Heaven and Earth is their breathing apparatus. Exhalation is not exhaustion, but the complement of inhalation, and this equally of that.
Hansen Is the space between Heaven and earth not like bellows and flutes? Empty and not warped. As long as you move them, they produce.
LaFargue The space between heaven and earth isn't it like a bellows? Empty, but not shriveled up, set it in motion and always more comes out.
Legge May not the space between heaven and earth be compared to a bellows? 'Tis emptied, yet it loses not its power; 'Tis moved again, and sends forth air the more.
Lindauer The space bounding heavens and earth is just like the equal of a bellows Empty yet not subdued Stirring yet more goes out.
LinYutan How the universe is like a bellows! Empty, yet it gives a supply that never fails; The more it is worked, the more it brings forth.
Mabry The space between Heaven and Earth is like a bellows empty, yet inexhaustible The more it is used, the more it produces.
McDonald Yet heaven and earth and all that lies between is like a bellows; empty, yet yielding a supply that hardly fails. Work it, and more comes out. Whereas the force of words is soon spent.
Merel Nature is like a bellows, Empty, yet never ceasing its supply. The more it moves, the more it yields;
Mitchell The Tao is like a bellows: it is empty yet infinitely capable. The more you use it, the more it produces;
Muller The space between Heaven and Earth is just like a bellows: Empty it, it is not exhausted. Squeeze it and more comes out.
Red Pine between Heaven and Earth how like a bellows empty but inexhaustible each movement produces more
Ta-Kao The space between heaven and earth is like a (blacksmith's) bellows. Hollow as it seems, nothing is lacking. If it is moved, more will it bring forth.
Walker Tao is like a bellows: empty but inexhaustible. The more you move it the more it makes.
Wayism The Tao is like a bellows; hollow yet infinitely capable 17. The more you use it the more it gives forth 18; the more you discuss it the less you understand.
Wieger The betwixt of heaven and earth, seat of the Principle, the place from where its virtue acts, is like a bellows, like the bag of a bellows of which heaven and earth would be the two boards, which empties itself without exhausting itself, which moves itself externally without cease.
World Infinity is like a bellows, empty yet encompassing the potential of all things.
Wu Between Heaven and Earth, There seems to be a Bellows: It is empty, and yet it is inexhaustible. The more it works the more comes out of it.


Ch. 05 Sentence 4
Beck Much talk brings exhaustion. It is better to keep to the center.
Blackney Much talk means much exhaustion; Better far it is to keep your thoughts!
Bynner Men come to their wit's end arguing about it And had better meet it at the marrow.
Byrn It is better not to speak of things you do not understand.
Chan Much talk will of course come to a dead end. It is better to keep to the center.
Cleary The talkative reach their wits' end again and again; that is not as good as keeping centered.
Crowley Speech exhausts; guard yourself, therefore, maintaining the perfect freedom of your nature.
Hansen Many words and numbers unlimited are not as good as holding the center.
LaFargue Much talking, quickly exhausted. It can't compare to watching over what is inside.
Legge Much speech to swift exhaustion lead we see; Your inner being guard, and keep it free.
Lindauer Much talk counts for little It can't compare to obeying the center.
LinYutan By many words is wit exhausted. Rather, therefore, hold to the core.
Mabry Trying to explain it will only exhaust you. It is better to hold on to paradox.
McDonald It seems far better to keep what's in the heart. So hold to the heart core and a regular mean.
Merel So the sage draws upon experience And cannot be exhausted.
Mitchell the more you talk of it, the less you understand. Hold on to the center.
Muller Investigating it with a lot of talk Is not like holding to the center.
Red Pine taking only wastes it better to keep it inside
Ta-Kao He who talks more is sooner exhausted: It is better to keep what is within himself.
Walker Too much talk about it evaporates your understanding, though. Simply stay at the center of the circle.
Wayism Hold on to the centre.
Wieger This is all that we can understand of the Principle and of its action as producer. To seek to detail it further using words and numbers would be a waste of time. Let us hold ourselves to this grand idea.
World Words are straw in the wind. The more one talks, the less one says. Keep focused on Infinity. Remain centered in the oneness of all things. In time all potentials manifest.
Wu No amount of words can fathom it: Better look for it within you.